The dynamism of landscape & lighting

Following my recent blog on Light, time and landscape, my good friend Paul Nulty of Nulty+ has written this response:

In his guest blog post, John Wyer (landscape designer and friend of Nulty’s) effuses about the dynamism of a landscape – not just through the changing seasons, but also with the passage of daylight. As a lighting designer such dynamic lighting inspires me, from the dappling of sunlight through woodland canopies, to flat, overcast light enhancing the greys of bark on deciduous trees.

When you consider how a landscape is constantly evolving and how the hierarchy of space becomes different under differing lighting conditions (artificial or natural), it becomes important for any landscape designer to capture the essence and hierarchy within the environment, and it’s great to read John acknowledge this.

Of course, artificial light excites me – it’s a medium with huge influence on the perception of landscape and placemaking. I previously discussed the impact of artificial lighting in my blog post “Light Time Economy”, so I won’t dwell again here. However, when it comes to light, we must make sure that not only is the right ambience captured, but that the right hierarchy is also presented.

This requires careful, strategic planning of even the smallest space. In the same way a landscape designer will carefully consider the size and mass of planting to create focal points and permeability, the lighting designer will use light to create contrast and drama to create focal points, depth, foreground, midground and background.

It’s very easy for artificial light to create a whole new perception and visual composition of a space, providing alternative focal points and balance than those achieved under daylight conditions.

Collaboration between landscape and lighting designer is imperative as there isn’t necessarily one way to light a landscape. We need to consider the seasons when planning an installation as shape, texture and colour will change. Certain light sources will emphasise different tones within the living landscape – tones that are ever changing, for example, highlighting the warmth of autumnal leaves or the blue/silver hue of a bare tree in winter.

We also need to give care and attention to the type of hardware used as some luminaires work more efficiently in different temperatures – what works in winter, may not in summer. It’s also wise to choose outdoor lighting that has a long lamp life for minimal maintenance.

A considered, holistic approach is also wise, and more often than not, less can actually be more. What isn’t illuminated is often as important as what is. I sometimes imagine “painting the space with light” when thinking about what should and shouldn’t be lit. And often, with less foliage, we require less light, or perhaps a focal point may shift from one end of the garden to another.

Landscape lighting for informed architects and developers has become as much a part of new home design as say, a good staircase. At the very least, entrances, steps and pathways are now tastefully and safely illuminated under the guidance of a lighting designer – we know the importance of how to highlight the areas of beauty and downplay the not-quite-so-beautiful parts. This also extends the internal spaces beyond the “window”, which would otherwise appear as a dark, reflective mirror. Drawing the eye beyond the interior to the garden extends the feeling of space.

It’d be amateur to say that “one size fits all” when lighting a landscape. Whether it’s a tiny suburban patch or acres of rolling parkland, if the use of light is well considered then there’s a clear opportunity to extend the use, view and ultimately connection with our outdoor environment. However, it needs a gentle touch and the expertise of a skilled lighting designer working hand in hand with landscape architects and garden designers – like John and his team at Bowles & Wyer – to make sure that light isn’t simply added on or considered at the end, but forms an integral part of the planning process, to truly capture the landscape’s aesthetic from season to season.